Analysis chain

Analysis chain

corporisfabrica:

The earliest known prosthesis, a toe from ancient Egypt. Dating back to the period 950 to 710 B.C.E, this wooden toe once belonged to an Egyptian noblewoman and would have assisted in walking, as well as contributing aesthetically. 

corporisfabrica:

The earliest known prosthesis, a toe from ancient Egypt. 
Dating back to the period 950 to 710 B.C.E, this wooden toe once belonged to an Egyptian noblewoman and would have assisted in walking, as well as contributing aesthetically. 

strangeremains:

Colchester: death by sword in Boudicca’s war?

The dramatic find just over a week ago of burnt human bone has turned out to be even more dramatic than first thought! Two bones were involved in the drama, one part of a jawbone (mandible) and the other the top part of a shinbone (tibia). They were found in Boudiccan debris at our excavation site at the Williams & Griffin store in the High Street at Colchester. The debris is from the massive fire which Boudicca and her army started to burn down the Roman town here, as part of their attempt to drive the Roman army out of Britain. Although large areas of Boudiccan debris under Colchester have been investigated in the past, this was only the second time human remains had been found in it. The first time was sixty years ago.

When eventually we were able to lift the bones out of the ground and have a close look at them, we had to rub our eyes in disbelief. The front part of the shinbone appears to have been chopped off and even part of the jawbone looks as if it has been sliced off too.  Reading archaeological bone in this way can be tricky so the bones will need to be examined by a specialist in ancient human bone. Nevertheless, the evidence looks pretty clear, even to us.

Read more at the Colchester Archaeologist

(via jangojips)

valdanderthal:

human

deer  

goat

bear   

dog

pig   

rabbit

opossum 

chicken

Source: Adams B, Crabtree P (2011) Comparative Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Guide of Common North American Animals. Academic Press.

(via ancient-anthropoids)

aprilcollison:

Medical illustration from second year. Coloured in Corel painter and Photoshop.

aprilcollison:

Medical illustration from second year. Coloured in Corel painter and Photoshop.

(via brains-and-bodies)

operatory5:

Left femur of a confederate soldier, white male, exhibiting attempts atrepair of a gunshot fracture of the upper third. Private E.W. A, CompanyG, 5th Regiment, Florida. Physician unknown. Civil War, Gettysburg,Pennsylvania. Pathological specimen 1938.

operatory5:

Left femur of a confederate soldier, white male, exhibiting attempts at
repair of a gunshot fracture of the upper third. Private E.W. A, Company
G, 5th Regiment, Florida. Physician unknown. Civil War, Gettysburg,
Pennsylvania. Pathological specimen 1938.

(Source: Flickr / medicalmuseum, via anthrocentric)

I just noticed that I loaded up a surface file for analysis this year that I prepared exactly two years ago…  This makes me feel as if time is moving too quickly and too slowly all at once. 

(Source: likeaboss9823)

Tags: not science

"Totentanz" (Dance of death)

Barfüßerkirche Erfurt, Germany

ex0skeletal:

(via Reconstruction by TylerDobbs on deviantART)

theolduvaigorge:

External Auditory Exostoses and Aquatic Activities During the Mesolithic and the Neolithic in Europe: Results from a Large Prehistoric Sample 

  • by Sébastien Villote, Sofija Stefanović and Christopher J. Knüsel

"External auditory exostosis (EAE) appears to be a faithful marker of water-related activities. The frequency of this condition has been calculated for 449 European Mesolithic and Neolithic individuals from several geographic regions. The condition is more frequent in females but not significantly so. Neolithic skeletons display significantly less EAE than Mesolithic ones. The very high frequency of EAE in Late Mesolithic samples is consistent with fishing subsistence activities, and the significant decrease in frequency in Neolithic populations provides further evidence (along with isotopic and other archaeological evidence) for a rapid abandonment of marine/freshwater resources after the transition" (read more/open access).

(Open access source: Anthropologie 52(1):73-89, 2014)

(via valdanderthal)

malformalady:

Articulated skeletal hand of a dwarf at the Museum of Osteology, OK

malformalady:

Articulated skeletal hand of a dwarf at the Museum of Osteology, OK

(via valdanderthal)